2007July13, Friday

Prophet of Baal Praying in Senate; Elijah Arrested

Posted in Current Events at 21:25 by Trey Austin

You may or may not have seen the incident yesterday at the opening of the Senate, where the illustrious Majority Leader and Senator from the only state in our Union that has legalized prostitution invited a Hindu cleric to pray to open the senate. Well, in what was reminiscent of Ian Paisley’s shouting down the Pope and being forcibly removed from the European Parliament in the 80s, a man starting praying out loud for forgiveness for our allowing an abominable prayer to be offered. If you haven’t seen the video, take a gander.

[kml_flashembed movie="http://youtube.com/v/g8vENZwp1rk" width="425" height="350" wmode="transparent" /]

So, what do you think? I have a hard time with these kinds of things. I’d like to say that i’d do something like this if it came down to it. But, too, there’s also the point of being respectful to others. People just don’t buy into the idea that we’re a Christian nation, which makes this at least somewhat different than the case of synchretism in the Temple of Jehovah or the government of Israel.

Yet, i still agree that our government should reflect our religion. That religion has always been Christian. Did the Founders of our nation codify our Christian religion in the Constitution? Not explicitly. But my guess is that they saw Christianity as so much part of the warp and woof of our national identity that they thought everyone would understand that Congress not passing any law respecting the establishment of religion meant not creating a State Church like the Church of England (i.e., favoring one Christian denomination over another). I can’t believe that our Foudning Fathers honestly intended for our government and nation to be completely areligious. And what’s really the difference between being areligious and being atheistic? I mean, if the governmnet was supposed to be completely without any kind of religious affirmation, why does the constitutional instructions concerning the time for the certification of elections and for the presentation of bills to the president that have been passed by Congress all explicitly exclude Sunday from having any kind of work done on it or being counted in the number of days for a deadline? That’s obviously Sabbatarian practice being codified into the Constitution itself. And so, if the *FOURTH* commandment has been codified (the traditional Christian understanding of it, to boot, not the Jewish or “Seventh-day” interpretation of it) into the supreme Law of our land, why would the *FIRST* commandment be so far off?

I don’t know. How do y’all see this issue? Am i just too close to Theonomy for comfort? Or am i being wishy-washy?

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5 Comments »

  1. Steven W said,

    Theocracy. Learn it. Love it.

    The Reformed tradition has always taught that the civil govt. is responsible to preserve peace *for the purpose of the preaching of the gospel.* There is no value to generic “justice” if it is not connected to the law-giver.

    Theonomy is wrong hermeneutically. It is not wrong socio-philosophically.

  2. Trey Austin said,

    Steven, i affirm that without question. Of course, that’s why i’ve been a Republican on the Libertarian fringe for quite some time. The question i have, though, is not in the realm of ideas, but in how to flesh it out in day-to-day circumstances like this one, especially in light of the fact that we live in a society and government that has codified areligionism as its only creed. It doesn’t make it any less religious, mind you, as you obviously can see from the video clip. However, how are Christians to respond to this? Should there be a mass response from Christians like the guy did in the gallery? Should we, as one elder at my presbytery suggested to me yesterday at our meeting, march on Washington and drag all 535 Congressmen out of the Capital Building kicking and scrreaming to show them what we think of their policies? Should we go the Moral Majority route and try and take over the government that way? Should we go the Christian Exodus route and find a nice quiet little place like my home state of South Carolina and seceed from the Union? Should we just homeschool our children, teach in our churches, and pray hard as we can until the little-by-little change reaches a tipping point? I just don’t see how to get where i think we should go from where we are right now. Of course, add to that that i’m still Amillennial enough to believe that the Kingdom of God’s advancement and the Gospel’s success isn’t necessarily tied to the transformation of society into an idyllic Christian habitat. That doesn’t mean that i’m pessimistic, mind you, but i don’t see any Scriptural indication of some Golden Age like most Postmils hold.

    I don’t know. It’s just perplexing to me.

  3. Steven W said,

    Oh I am wholly sympathetic with your concern. The Church can’t stand up to govt. officials in its current status. We can perhaps do ground-level and individual activities, where we let our congressman have a piece of our mind, but the Church needs to be reformed and restored to a higher place in the American psyche before it can exert any large scale influence.

    The Scritprural indication of Golden Age is just simply the teaching that the Rock (Jesus) will fill the earth, and his feet (the Church) will crush Satan (Rom. 16:20/Gen. 3:15). After that it is all golden.

    Of course I’m working on a 40,000 year calendar.

  4. David Ponter said,

    The obstructionist was right, as he is a member of the lower magistrate. Now if one of peons were to do it to a lower magistrate, that is another thing.

    David

  5. […] Anyone who’s bothered to read the NT knows that false teaching within the church is nothing new. But, to me, this is far worse than the Hindu speaking in the Senate that my buddy Trey posted a few days back. At least, in that case, folks can see the wolves coming into the sheep fold from a mile away. Here, the threat is much more covert, imho. Of course, this might not be a problem if whoever has oversight over the pastor (assuming that this is not some independent congregation where he essentially is the church, which might entirely be the case) would exercise a bit of discipline in this case. […]


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